Tripple Brook Farm

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Genus: P

Pachysandra
Alleghany pachysandra; Japanese pachysandra
Panicum
switch-grass
Parthenium
wild quinine
Parthenocissus
Virginia creeper; woodbine
Passiflora
passionflower; Maypop; apricot vine
Paxistima
cliff green; mountain lover
Peltandra
arrow-arum; tuckahoe
Pennisetum
Chinese pennisetum
Penstemon
St. Joseph's wand; pine-leaved penstemon
Petasites
fuki; giant fuki; giant sweet coltsfoot; sweet coltsfoot
Phalaris
ribbon grass
Philadelphus
mock orange
Phlox
phlox; flowering moss; ground pink; wild sweet William
Phragmites
variegated common reed grass
Phyllostachys
bamboo
Physostegia
obedient plant
Pleioblastus
bamboo
Podophyllum
Mayapple; wild lemon
Polemonium
Greek valerian; Jacob's ladder; bluebell
Polygonatum
hairy Solomon's-seal
Polygonum
knotweed
Polypodium
polypody
Polystichum
Christmas fern
Polytrichum
(soft haircap moss); common haircap moss
Poncirus
hardy orange; trifoliate orange
Pontederia
pickerel weed
Potentilla
bush cinquefoil; golden cinquefoil; shrubby cinquefoil; three-toothed cinquefoil
Prunus
wild plum; wild cherry
Pseudosasa
bamboo
Psidium
Cattley guava; purple strawberry guava
Pycnanthemum
mountain mint
Pyrola
shinleaf; wild lily-of-the-valley

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Catalog as of January 02, 2016

Podophyllum

(Berberidaceae - barberry family)
Two or more species of rhizomatous, herbaceous perennials, native to North America and Asia. Cultivated as ornamentals, the plants also possess potent medicinal properties and are used as a source of the drug podophyllin

peltatum peren • ht 12-18" • zones 3-9

Mayapple; wild lemon


native, edible fruit, ground cover, sun - shade
e and cent NA

The deeply cut, umbrella-like leaves of this common wildflower of woodlands grow to 12" across, and are carried on upright stalks 12 to 18" tall. This very tough plant spreads slowly to form a dense colony. It can make an excellent, handsome, long-lived, care-free groundcover, and is suitable for covering large areas. The leaves tend to go dormant in late summer, although dormancy is delayed if the plants do not lack for moisture. Mayapple thrives here in full sun, as long as the soil is moist, but it will tolerate drier soil and warmer climates better if it has some shade. The fruit, which looks like a small lemon and has a flavor reminiscent of tropical fruits, is edible when fully ripe in late summer. Fruit flavor is unusual, though agreeable, but the fruit is best eaten in small quantities. The fruit is a favorite food of box turtles and small rodents. Derivatives of Mayapple have shown promise in selectively killing cancer cells. All plant parts, except for ripe fruits, are poisonous if eaten. Exposure to sap can cause skin irritation in sensitive individuals.

cat # 1O7J
$9.95 each / 3+, $9.50 ea