Tripple Brook Farm

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Genus: A

Acanthus
bear's breech
Acorus
sweet flag
Actinidia
hardy kiwi fruit; bower vine; kolomikta vine; tara vine
Adiantum
northern maidenhair fern
Agastache
Giant hyssop
Ajuga
Bugleweed
Akebia
five-leaved akebia
Allium
onion; chives
Ammophila
American beachgrass
Amphicarpaea
hog peanut
Amsonia
Arkansas blue-star; blue star; thread-leaf blue star; willow amsonia
Andropogon
big bluestem; turkey-foot
Anemone
Canada anemone
Antennaria
pussytoes
Anthoxanthum
sweet vernal grass
Apios
Indian potato; groundnut
Aquilegia
Columbine
Aralia
sarsparilla
Arctostaphylos
bearberry; kinnikinick
Arenaria
Arisaema
Aristolochia
Armeria
sea pink
Aruncus
Goatsbeard
Arundinaria
canebrake bamboo; large cane; small canebrake bamboo; southern cane; switch cane
Arundo
giant reed; Italian reed; cana brava
Asarum
Wild ginger
Asclepias
butterfly weed; swamp milkweed
Asimina
pawpaw
Aster
aster
Athyrium
lady fern
Atrichum
(moss)

Next: B

Catalog as of January 02, 2016

Asimina

(Annonaceae - custard apple family)
Eight species of North American shrubs or small trees. Cultivated as ornamentals, and for their edible fruit.

Asimina triloba - May 20 Asimina triloba - Oct 5 Asimina triloba 'Sunflower' - Sep 27 Asimina triloba 'Taylor 2' - Sep 30
triloba decid tree or shr • ht 20 - 30' • zones 5-8

pawpaw


native, edible fruit, screen, wildlife, sun - part shade
e and cent US; s Ontario

A temperate zone representative of a primarily tropical family, the pawpaw is distinctly tropical in appearance. It typically develops into a small tree, with large drooping leaves to 1' long. Sends up root suckers and tends to form a small grove in time if it is allowed to. The purple flowers, 1-2" across, appear in spring before the leaves develop. The fruits, which ripen in fall and may be anywhere from 2-6" long, look somewhat like elongated potatoes. Pawpaw fruit was an important food of the Indians and early settlers; it is again now beginning to attract the attention it deserves. Good-flavored pawpaw fruit has been compared to a sweet, rich egg custard in taste and consistency.

Dr. William Desmond, writing about the currently ongoing work to develop the pawpaw as a cultivated crop in the Fall '96 issue of Pomona, the magazine of the North American Fruit Explorers (NAFEX, Rt. 1, Box 94, Chapin, IL 62628), mentions some interesting facts about this plant. "The fruits were reported to once have saved Lewis and Clark from starvation in 1806. Daniel Boone and Mark Twain were reported to have been pawpaw fans." Desmond also mentions that in work done over the past 16 years at Purdue University, pharmacognosist Dr. Jerry McLaughlin has identified about 30 biologically active compounds from pawpaw plants. One of these, asimicin, has been "a million times more effective than adriamycin (a standard chemotherapy drug) in treating human cancers in cell culture. One molecule of asimicin is enough to kill a cancer cell."

The tree is notably free of pests and diseases. It is said that even cows, goats, rabbits (and presumably, deer) will scarcely touch it. One of the few insects which uses the pawpaw tree as a food source is the larva of the beautiful zebra swallowtail butterfly. Prefers moist, rich soil with a near neutral pH, but is quite adaptable. Unusually tolerant of shade for a fruit tree, and can bear fruit even when growing in the forest understory (but should have plenty of sun for best fruit production). The plants offered here are grown from seed from cultivated varieties. At least two trees should be planted for cross-pollination. The trees begin blossoming when they are about 6' tall. Note: In rare instances, eating the fruit causes allergic reactions.

4¼" pot, 8-12" tall, cat # 1C3N1 $14.95 each / 3+, $14.50 ea.
½ gal., 12-24" tall, cat # 1C3N2 $22.95 each.