Tripple Brook Farm

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Common Names: C

calla, water
Calla palustris
calla, wild
Calla palustris
cana brava
Arundo donax
cane, large
Arundinaria gigantea
cane, southern
Arundinaria gigantea
cankerroot
Coptis groenlandica
cardinal flower
Lobelia cardinalis
Carolina silverbell tree
Halesia carolina
carpet bugleweed
Ajuga reptans
cassandra
Chamaedaphne calyculata
catnip
Nepeta cataria
Cattley guava
Psidium littorale longipes
chamomile, Roman
Chamaemelum nobile
checkerberry
Gaultheria procumbens
cherry, rum
Prunus serotina
cherry, wild black
Prunus serotina
chimaki-zasa
Sasa palmata
chives
Allium schoenoprasum
chives, Chinese
Allium tuberosum
chocolate root
Geum rivale
cholla, chain-link cactus
Opuntia imbricata
chorogi
Stachys affinis
cinnamon vine
Dioscorea batatas
cliff green
Paxistima canbyi
club moss, tree
Lycopodium obscurum
clumping baby's breath
Gypsophila cerastioides
cobweb houseleek
Sempervivum arachnoideum
coltsfoot, giant sweet
Petasites japonicus giganteus
coltsfoot, sweet
Petasites japonicus
columbine, wild
Aquilegia canadensis
common cat-tail
Typha latifolia
common houseleek
Sempervivum tectorum
common scouring rush
Equisetum hyemale
common tansy
Tanacetum vulgare
common wood-rush
Luzula multiflora ssp multiflora
coneflower, purple
Echinacea purpurea
cordgrass, variegated prairie
Spartina pectinata aureomarginata
coreopsis, stiff
Coreopsis palmata
Corsican mint
Mentha requienii
Corsican moss
Sagina subulata
cranberry
Vaccinium macrocarpon
cranberry, highbush
Viburnum trilobum
creeping lilyturf
Liriope spicata
creeping thyme
Thymus doerfleri 'Elfin'
creeping thyme
Thymus praecox
creeping veronica
Veronica prostrata
creeping veronica
Veronica repens
cross vine
Bignonia capreolata
culver's root
Veronicastrum virginicum 'Albo-Rosea'
cup plant
Silphium perfoliatum

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Catalog as of January 02, 2016

Thymus

(Labiatae - thyme family)
About 300-400 spp. of pleasantly scented small shrubs or perennial herbs of Europe and Asia. Commonly grown as ornamentals in gardens and walks, most notable is T. vulgaris widely used as a seasoning herb. Well suited for bonsai. Thyme species are host plants by some Lepidoptera and Coleophora species of which C. niveicostella, C. serpylletorum and C. struella feed exclusively on thymes. They prefer a light, well drained soil, and plenty of sun. The following species tolerate dry soil and can be used as rock garden plants or ground covers for small areas.

doerfleri 'Elfin' 'Elfin' creeping thyme • ht 1-2" • zones 3-9

(creeping thyme)


new, container, fragrant, ground cover, rock garden, sun - part shade
e US

This low-growing, tiny-leaved, very aromatic creeper spreads slowly to form a dense, carpet-like mat. Bears petite lavender flowers in the late spring. Grows well in full sun or light shade but needs light, porous, well-drained soil. Does well in sandy soil. Excellent in rock gardens, containers, or between stepping stones. Will tolerate light foot traffic; releases it pleasant aroma when stepped on.

cat # 6G8GE
$8.95 each / 3+, $8.50 ea


praecox evgrn peren • ht 8" • zones 4-9

(creeping thyme)

Thymus praecox - May 31


edible, fragrant, ground cover, rock garden, dry - moist, sun
Europe

Long, trailing stems; small roundish leaves. The small, pinkish-purple flowers appear in summer.

cat # 6G8P
$8.95 each


serpyllum peren • ht 3-6" • zones 4-9

mother-of-thyme


new, edible, fragrant, ground cover, rock garden, dry - moist, sun
Europe

This classic, low growing groundcover is often planted between the stones or bricks in garden paths for its beauty and sweet minty aroma. Can be used on for hanging down walls, but leaves have little aroma without bruising. Similar to garden thyme but smaller, mat-forming and deciduous. Produces masses of tiny purple flowers in whorls over an extended flowering period from late spring through summer and a golden flush with spring growth. Once established, it is not only drought tolerant, but prefers drier, low fertility soil. Wild thyme covers large areas of droughty, rocky soils in southern Europe, and similar landscapes in the Berkshire and Catskill mountains. Considered important honeybee plant. Greece is known for producing wild thyme honey. Can be used for cooking. Used medicinally an antiseptic and as a respiratory dilator.

cat # 6G8V
$8.95 each